Derby and District Astronomical Society

Messier 13 (NGC 6205)
The Hercules Cluster

Globular Cluster in Hercules
RA 16h 41m 42s  Dec +36° 28' 00"

[Messier Index]


This image of M13 was taken by Mike Lancaster on the 8th August 2023. The image comprises 60 x 5s exposures taken using an Altair Hypercam 26C at 300 gain (plus darks, flats and flat darks), through an Orion Optics UK AG12 Astrograph mounted on an EQ8 mount. A 0.95x Wynne Corrector and Optolong L-Pro filter were also employed. No guiding was used on account of the short exposures. Images were acquired using SharpCap, and the processing was entirely performed in PixInsight.   Image Credit: Mike Lancaster.



DDAS members Brian Dodson and Mike Lancaster captured this image of M13 on the night of Sunday 21st May 2023 at the Society's Flamsteed Observatory. It is a live stack captured with an Altair GPCAM 327C through an 80mm Altair Starwave ED refractor. The refractor was piggybacked on a 10" Meade SCT and mounted on an NEQ6 mount. Altair Capture was used to acquire the image, and no guiding or processing was employed. The image is as seen on screen at the time.   Image Credit: Brian Dodson & Mike Lancaster.



This image of M13 is a combination of two separate images taken by Peter Branson on 7th and 4th July 2022 and comprises a total exposure time of 100 minutes. The images were taken with a ZWO ASI533 cooled colour camera together with a TS Optics Photoline f7 telescope with a Hutech IDAS light pollution filter and field flattener attached, mounted on an NEQ6 mount. A filter wheel fitted with LRGBHa filters was used to capture these images (Luminance only). The images were stacked in Nebulosity, then PixInsight was used to remove background gradients and noise and some further post-processing including using levels and curves. Peter says - "M13 is a popular target with astrophotographers. The trick is not to get the central stars overexposed and also to show the globular cluster's full range of colour and brightness. I'm on a steep learning curve with PixInsight but it is proving its worth."   Image Credit: Peter Branson



The following image of M13 was captured by Dave Selfe on the 25th March 2022. It is comprised of 50 x 31 second lights and 30 x 31 second darks using a ZWO ASI178MC camera with an IDAS D1 filter, attached to a Sky Watcher Esprit 100ED telescope.   Image Credit: Dave Selfe



Dave Selfe captured this image of M13 on the 19th March 2022. It is comprised of 24 x 60 second exposures using a ZWO ASI178MC camera with the gain set to 210, attached to a Sky Watcher Esprit 100ED telescope.   Image Credit: Dave Selfe



This image of M13 was captured by Mike Lancaster on the 20th July 2021. It is comprised of a stack of four 4 minute exposures taken with a Mallincam Universe camera attached to a 10-inch Meade ACF SCT on an EQ-8 mount. A 0.5x Mallincam focal reducer was also used. The camera was set to a gain of 16dB, a gamma of -20, a contrast of 0, noise reduction on and 2x2 binning. No guiding, flats or dark frames were used. Stacking and processing was done in Nebulosity 3.   Image Credit: Mike Lancaster



Brian Dodson captured this image of M13 on the 17th July 2017. It is made up of a series of 5 x 25 second exposures, stacked and enhanced in Registax. Brian used a 5" Explore Scientific refractor with an Orion G3 colour CCD camera. The images were all shot in raw mode with no RGB filtration. So the final image is also a raw image.   Image Credit: Brian Dodson



This image of M13 was captured by Adrian Brown on the nights of the 23rd and 24th of May 2009. The image data consists of 16 x 4 minutes Red, 16 x 4 minutes Green and 18 x 4 minutes Blue using Astronomik RGB filters, a Skywatcher 80ED refractor (reduced to 480mm focal length with a William Optics 0.8x focal reducer) and an Atik ATK16HR CCD camera. The image data was stacked and calibrated in Maxim DL 4.53, aligned with Registar and processed in Photoshop CS2.   Image Credit: Adrian Brown



Chris Newsome took the following image of M13 on the 2nd June 2006. He used a Canon EOS300D camera through a Celestron C8-NGT telescope using a CLS filter. This set up was autoguided with a Meade DSI through a Skywatcher 80T refractor using MaximDL. The image is composed of ten 120 second exposures at 800 ASA, which were calibrated in MaximDL and then processed in CS2.   Image Credit: Chris Newsome



The following image of M13 in Hercules was taken by Simon Allcock, Adrian Brown and Chris Newsome on the evening of 7th/8th June 2005. It was taken through Simon's 8" LX90, with Chris' Meade Deep Sky Imager and Adrian's 0.5 focal reducer! The image was processed using Registax and Photoshop.   Image Credit: Simon Allcock, Adrian Brown and Chris Newsome



Chris Newsome took the following picture with his new Meade Deep Sky Imager on the 6th June 2005.   Image Credit: Chris Newsome



Chris Newsome took the following image of globular cluster M13 on the 11th May 2005 using a Meade DSI camera and a Celestron C6-Newtonian.   Image Credit: Chris Newsome



Adrian Brown took the following image of the globular cluster M13 in Hercules on the 10th April 2005. He used a Celestron C11 at F3.3 and an ATK-1C camera. The image is a composite of 2 thirty second exposures stacked in K3CCD Tools and the image was dark frame adjusted to remove 'hot' pixels. Final processing was performed in Photoshop to convert the image to greyscale and remove some background sky glow.   Image Credit: Adrian Brown



This image of the globular cluster M13 in Hercules was taken by Adrian Brown under the dark skies of Madog's Wells in Powys, Wales on the 1st April 2005. He used a 5 inch Celestron NexStar SCT at F6.3 and an ATK-1C camera. The image is a stacked composite of 3x 30 second exposures which were combined in K3CCDTools.   Image Credit: Adrian Brown

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