Derby and District Astronomical Society

The Moon - 9 days old

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Peter Branson obtained this image of the Vallis Alpes was from an 80-second AVI video of 2500 frames. The video was taken on March 18th 2016 and was processed in AutoStakkert and the best 10% of these frames were stacked. The resulting image was imported into Registax and, using the wavelets tool, further sharpening was applied. The video was taken with a ZWO ASI224-Cool high frame rate camera through a Hutech IDAS light pollution filter attached to a Celestron C9.25 Schmitt-Cassegrain telescope. The telescope arrangement was mounted on an HEQ5 mount. Running along the length of the valley floor is a thin rille - a popular, but difficult target for astro-photographers.  Image Copyright: Peter Branson.






The following three images of the 68% illuminated moon were taken on the 20th December 2015 by Robert Seymour. All three images are single frames taken with a Sony A7s mirrorless full frame camera at the prime focus of Rob's 5.2" refractor. The top image shows the whole lunar disk and used a 2x Powermate (Barlow) at 1/500 s and ISO 800. The middle picture is and uncropped image (using a 4x and a 2x Powermate together) of the Mare Imbrium region with the large craters Copernicus (bottom left) and Plato (top right). Rob comments that you can see a bit of vignetting in the corners due to the full frame sensor being too big. Exposure was 1/250 s at ISO 16000 (and that is thousand, not hundred). The bottom picture of the three is a cropped close up of Copernicus crater using a 4x Powermate with an exposure of 1/125 s at ISO 800.  Image Copyright: Robert Seymour.








Peter Branson took this image of the Montes Alps region of the moon around the 8th April 2014. It shows the Vallis Alpes (160km x10km) in the top right of the image. The crater Aristoteles (87km) is shown bottom right and the crater Eudoxus (67km) slightly to the left at the bottom of the image. The crater Cassini (57km) is just above the centre of the picture. The image was captured from a 60 second .MOV video at 30 frames/second. The video was converted to a .AVI movie in PIPP (Planetary Imaging PreProcessor) and the best 500 frames were chosen. These frames were then stacked and sharpened in AVIStack2. The video was captured using a Canon 1100D attached to TS Photoline ED102 refractor telescope with TS ED x2.5 Barlow lens and Powermate x5 attached giving a magnification of about 300x.  Image Copyright: Peter Branson.





Peter Branson also took this image of the Montes Apenninus region of the moon around the 8th April 2014. It shows the crater Eratosthenes (58km) at the bottom left with the Montes Apenninus (~600km) extending diagonally across the image. The image was captured from a 60 second .MOV video at 30 frames/second. The video was converted to a .AVI movie in PIPP (Planetary Imaging PreProcessor) and the best 500 frames were chosen. These frames were then stacked and sharpened in AVIStack2. The video was captured using a Canon 1100D attached to TS Photoline ED102 refractor telescope with TS ED x2.5 Barlow lens and Powermate x5 attached giving a magnification of about 300x.  Image Copyright: Peter Branson.





This picture of the Moon was taken on the evening of the 1st February 2012 by Jeremy Manship using the camera in a Blackberry phone pointed at the eyepiece of a Skywatcher 10" Dobsonian telescope.  Image Copyright: Jeremy Manship.


Chris Newsome produced this mosaic of the Moon on the 14th May 2008 from 11 separate pictures (totalling around 1100 frames). These were stacked in Registax v4 and processed in CS2. The images were taken using a Meade LPI camera attached to a 2x Barlow lens on a Celestron C8-NGT.  Image Copyright: Chris Newsome.


This mosaic of the Moon was taken by Chris Newsome on the 20th October 2007 at a DDAS observing session. Chris had taken his laptop and a Meade LPI with him to the observatory as he had wanted to try and capture some frames of the moon and he wasn't disappointed. Here is a mosaic of 6 images (each about 50 frames) captured through the Society's 10" Newtonian, stacked in Registax V4 and then processed in CS2. Read Chris' full report on the observing session here.  Image Copyright: Chris Newsome.



Chris Newsome took this picture of the Moon on the 31st October 2006. He used a Meade LPI camera through a Skywatcher 80T telescope. Due to the unsteadiness of the atmosphere that night Chris took 336 frames. These were stacked in Registax V4 using a 3 point multi-align. Processing was done in CS2. The large circular impact basin of Mare Imbrium straddles the terminator (the boundary between lunar night and day) in the upper portion of the image, while the prominent crater Copernicus lies just below it. A close-up view of the Mare Imbrium region was imaged on the same night by Chris and appears below this picture.  Image Copyright: Chris Newsome.



This image is a close-up of the Mare Imbrium region of the Moon taken by Chris Newsome on the 31st October 2006. He used a Meade LPI camera through a Celestron C8-NGT telescope. Due to the unsteadiness of the atmosphere that night Chris took 288 frames. These were stacked in Registax V4 using a single point alignment. Processing was done in CS2. Chris notes: "After imaging, I reverted to the original use a telescope was designed for, namely visual. The moon was fantastic through the C8, unfortunately the images don't do it justice. It's an object I never ever get tired of looking at".  Image Copyright: Chris Newsome.



The following image of the Moon was taken by Chris Newsome on the 20th December 2004 through his Celestron C6-N using a Meade LPI camera. Further information is provided on the picture.  Image Copyright: Chris Newsome.


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