Derby and District Astronomical Society

Star Trails

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Peter Hill took this picture of star trails over the dome of the Society's Flamsteed Observatory at our observing session on the 17th May 2014. He used 10 x 10 minute exposures using a Canon 450D camera with a 15 mm fisheye lens at ISO 200 and F3.5, and 10 dark frames. Processing was done using StarStaX and Photoshop Elements 4. The movement of the dome during the evening provides an interesting effect.




This star trail photo was taken at Page, Lake Powell in Arizona by DDAS member Chris Newsome while on holiday there in August 2012. It is a combination of about 45 minutes worth of images.




Chris Newsome took this photo of star trails from his observatory in Derby in 2009. The Plough can be seen at lower left and the 'W' of Cassiopeia to the right. Taken with a Canon 400D and a 10mm lens piggybacked on a stationary Celestron C8-NGT. The image comprises 18x60sec exposures at 200ASA.



It is confirmed that there is a black hole in the skies over the Society's Flamsteed Observatory that sucks aeroplanes and satellites into it with a whirling vortex surrounding the event horizon! The following image of star trails was taken on the evening of 26th September 2009 by Chris Newsome. Ursa Major is to the left of the picture, Cassiopea to the right. Technical details:- 27x45sec exposures, Canon 400D, 10mm super-wide angle lens, 400ASA, processed in Startrails v1.1 and CS2.



Chris Newsome took this image of star trails around the North Celestial Pole on the 24th May 2009. He used 36 five minute exposures (with a five second break between each frame) taken with a Canon 400D, 30mm lens, and processed in StarTrails v1.1.



At the DDAS observing session on Saturday 22nd November 2008 at Brailsford, Chris Newsome pointed a Canon 400D camera with 18mm lens at the Pole Star, set the exposure at 4 mins at 400ASA, to see what would be recorded! Are there really that many stars in the night sky?



The following picture of star trails was taken by Chris Newsome on the 25th September 2005. He used a Canon 300D camera with a 55mm lens at f/5, 100ASA, and a 40 minute exposure. The camera was pointed at Polaris (the bright star in the lower part the picture). Dark frame subtraction was made in K3CCDTools and the final image processed in Photoshop v7.

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